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wetwareontologies:


Molecular Visions of DNA 
The DNA of a Eukaryotic chromosome has the shape of a fractal helix with six levels of coiling.  The fractal shape allows for all sizes of the chromosome to be unpacked and transcribed efficiently.
Video Credit: Drew Barry
wetwareontologies:


Molecular Visions of DNA 
The DNA of a Eukaryotic chromosome has the shape of a fractal helix with six levels of coiling.  The fractal shape allows for all sizes of the chromosome to be unpacked and transcribed efficiently.
Video Credit: Drew Barry
wetwareontologies:


Molecular Visions of DNA 
The DNA of a Eukaryotic chromosome has the shape of a fractal helix with six levels of coiling.  The fractal shape allows for all sizes of the chromosome to be unpacked and transcribed efficiently.
Video Credit: Drew Barry
wetwareontologies:


Molecular Visions of DNA 
The DNA of a Eukaryotic chromosome has the shape of a fractal helix with six levels of coiling.  The fractal shape allows for all sizes of the chromosome to be unpacked and transcribed efficiently.
Video Credit: Drew Barry
wetwareontologies:


Molecular Visions of DNA 
The DNA of a Eukaryotic chromosome has the shape of a fractal helix with six levels of coiling.  The fractal shape allows for all sizes of the chromosome to be unpacked and transcribed efficiently.
Video Credit: Drew Barry
wetwareontologies:


Molecular Visions of DNA 
The DNA of a Eukaryotic chromosome has the shape of a fractal helix with six levels of coiling.  The fractal shape allows for all sizes of the chromosome to be unpacked and transcribed efficiently.
Video Credit: Drew Barry

wetwareontologies:

Molecular Visions of DNA

The DNA of a Eukaryotic chromosome has the shape of a fractal helix with six levels of coiling.  The fractal shape allows for all sizes of the chromosome to be unpacked and transcribed efficiently.

Video Credit: Drew Barry

Open access explained

"Sequencing the human genome was once likened to sending a man to the moon. The comparison turns out to be literally correct because sending a man to the moon is easy; its getting him back that is difficult and expensive. Today the human genome sequence is, so to speak, stranded on a metaphorical moon and it is our task to bring it back to Earth and give it the life it deserves."
Sydney Brenner on "Sequences and Consequences" Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 12 January 2010 vol. 365 no. 1537 207-212. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2009.0221

'Penis worms” anuses shake the ground of evolutionary biology

Deuterostomic Development in the Protostome 'Penis worm'

The ‘Penis worm’ is a member of the Priapulids which have long been classed as protostomes (“mouth first”), a branch of animals whose embryos develop a mouth before developing an anus. Most invertebrates fall into the protostome category, while vertebrates, as well as a few lines of invertebrate animals are deuterostomes (“mouth second”), meaning our anuses develop before our mouths. The division between protostomes and deuterostomes, first established in 1908, is an evolutionarily significant one and has informed our understanding of how various types of animals developed.

A new study on priapulids may throw a wrench into that division, however. A team led by Andreas Hejnol, an evolutionary developmental biologist at the University of Bergen in Norway, examined the genes associated with mouth and anus formation in three-day-old priapulid embryos. When the first set of cells caved in, the genes associated with priapulid rears activated, suggesting those cells were caving in order to form an anus.

If it turns out that priapulid anuses do form before their mouths do, biologists can’t simply declare them deuterostomes and call it a day. Priapulids are too closely related to other protostomes; the researchers suspect this means that early protostomes formed differently than their younger relatives do. It would also mean that the classifications of “protostome” and “deuterostome” would probably have to be revised, forcing evolutionary biologists to rethink these divisions altogether.

See the original paper here

The significance of [memory] priming is well known — at least intuitively — to advertisers, teachers, spouses, and others who want to influence the way we think and act.

Purves D, et al. Neuroscience, 3rd Ed. page 736

Can anyone explain why are spouses mentioned here??

neurosciencestuff:

Why stem-cell science thrives in Japan
It’s easy to take for granted the epic scale of what some scientists are attempting these days. When the news broke a couple of weeks ago that Japanese scientists had turned normal cells from a mouse into eggs, and then fertilized them and seen them develop into baby mice, I thought it was pretty cool.
But I wasn’t that surprised.
I knew that Katsuhiko Hayashi — one of the scientists involved — was doing fascinating research on stem cells at Kyoto University, and so this seemed a natural progression for his work to take.
Then I spoke to him and his boss. What they said reminded me that they are attempting to do something that, until recently, would have blown the mind of almost any scientist, philosopher or other kind of intellectual there’s ever been throughout the whole of human history.
Mitinori Saitou, who is head of Hayashi’s lab at the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the Graduate School of Medicine, was highly ambitious from an early age, and became particularly focused when he was doing his PhD as a young man.
“I got interested in germ-cell biology and the regulation of the cell fates,” he told me, “hoping that one day it may be possible to develop a methodology to control cellular fate at will.”
To control fate: It’s like something out of a Greek myth.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Why stem-cell science thrives in Japan

It’s easy to take for granted the epic scale of what some scientists are attempting these days. When the news broke a couple of weeks ago that Japanese scientists had turned normal cells from a mouse into eggs, and then fertilized them and seen them develop into baby mice, I thought it was pretty cool.

But I wasn’t that surprised.

I knew that Katsuhiko Hayashi — one of the scientists involved — was doing fascinating research on stem cells at Kyoto University, and so this seemed a natural progression for his work to take.

Then I spoke to him and his boss. What they said reminded me that they are attempting to do something that, until recently, would have blown the mind of almost any scientist, philosopher or other kind of intellectual there’s ever been throughout the whole of human history.

Mitinori Saitou, who is head of Hayashi’s lab at the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the Graduate School of Medicine, was highly ambitious from an early age, and became particularly focused when he was doing his PhD as a young man.

“I got interested in germ-cell biology and the regulation of the cell fates,” he told me, “hoping that one day it may be possible to develop a methodology to control cellular fate at will.”

To control fate: It’s like something out of a Greek myth.

Read more

"Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses—especially learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else."
Leonardo da Vinci (via weirdflower)
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The pompom crab dance and it’s anemone pompoms

The Long & Winding Road to a PhD

a-girl-named-alice:

Heart shaped music from the Medieval Era :D
Brief Info: The sheet music for Baude Cordier’s chanson “Belle, bonne, sage” which is a classic example of ars subtilior. (can’t you tell I’m a music geek…)

a-girl-named-alice:

Heart shaped music from the Medieval Era :D

Brief Info: The sheet music for Baude Cordier’s chanson “Belle, bonne, sage” which is a classic example of ars subtilior. (can’t you tell I’m a music geek…)

biologylair:

Many vertebrate skulls are capable of cranial kinesis, or movement within the skull. Such kinetic skulls occur when the upper jaw and lateral bones rotate upon each other during feeding. This occurs in ancient fishes, bony fishes, early tetrapods, reptiles, birds, and early synapsids. This kinesis does not, however, occur in mammals, since the upper jaw is fused to the actual braincase.

Cranial kinesis provides organisms with significant feeding advantages by allowing the mouth to rapidly change in conformation. The movement reduces pressure in the buccal cavity of fishes, allowing the organisms to suck in their prey, as well as swing teeth outward to capture prey.

Photo Credit: Photograph courtesy Edith Widder, via National Geographic